Informal Intervention Approach:

In circumstances in which an addicted or mentally ill individual has expressed some motivation to change, and has insight into their illness but needs some additional support and guidance to take action, Sarah will conduct an informal intervention in the office.
 Typically speaking at least one family member or a concerned loved one will be involved in this process. This type of intervention is only appropriate for an individual that has expressed some willingness or desire to become engaged in treatment and needs help determining appropriate level of care. This process includes:
  1. Identifying the presenting problem

  2. Obtaining a thorough history of illness and past treatment efforts

  3. Identifying co-occurring mental health or medical issues

  4. Identifying barriers or potential barriers to treatment

  5. Providing addiction education and/or psychoeducation

  6. Increasing family’s insight regarding enabling behaviors

  7. Provide Recommendations

  8. Initiate referrals to a higher level of care if deemed appropriate and secure treatment

  9. Arrange transport to facility

Formal Intervention Approach:

In situations in which the individual struggling with addiction and/or serious mental health issues lacks motivation and/or insight into his/her illness, or has been noncompliant with treatment in the past, a formal intervention would be appropriate.
Sarah uses a structured family intervention (Love First) approach to assisting families or concerned loved ones to engage their loved one struggling with addiction (substance abuse or behavioral/process addiction) or mental illness in treatment. In contrast with some other intervention models, this is a non-confrontational, compassionate approach to helping families engage their loved ones into treatment. In order to conduct an effective intervention in accordance with this model there typically needs to be a minimum of 2 pre-intervention planning meetings prior to the intervention. The process includes:
  1. Arranging transport to facility and or provide an escort when deemed appropriate

  2. Initiating referrals and securing treatment

  3. Working with family to determine the appropriate level of care based on age, clinical issues, treatment history, financial resources and geographical preferences

  4. Providing guidelines and support for writing intervention letters, developing bottom lines and responding to potential adversity

  5. Addressing loved ones’ ambivalence regarding conducting the intervention and processing negative emotions associated with the addicted/mentally individual’s

  6. Increasing family’s insight regarding enabling behaviors

  7. Providing addiction education and/or psychoeducation,

  8.  Identifying barriers or potential barriers to treatment

  9.  Identifying co-occurring mental health or medical issues

  10. Obtaining a thorough history of illness and past treatment efforts

  11. Identifying the presenting problem

  12. Supporting family throughout the treatment process, provide updates on treatment progress

  13. Assisting treatment team with discharge planning